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DNS Records and what they are 

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StudioCoast support a variety of DNS records that can be added and edited via the hostControl panel. These include A, MX, CNAME, SRV and TXT records. Below is basic description for what each of these are.

What is DNS A MX CNAME TXT SRV


  What is DNS?


DNS stands for Domain Name System. This system allows you to control what services are connected to your domain name, such as websites and email. The hostControl panel features a "DNS Manager" section which allows you to manage your DNS records for your domain name. If you have a DNS service with us and would like to manage your DNS from within hostControl, then you will firstly need to ensure your domain name's Name Servers are pointing to StudioCoast. To do this, you firstly need to login to your account with whom you registered your domain name through, then find the section called "Name Servers". The StudioCoast Name Servers are:

Primary Server: ns1.auzgc.com
Primary Server IP: 103.4.212.2
Secondary Server: ns2.auzgc.com
Secondary Server IP: 52.64.132.13

If you registered your domain name with StudioCoast, you likely already have your Name Servers pointing to us. But you can check by logging into hostControl and following the below Knowledge Base article guide:
https://www.studiocoast.com.au/knowledgebase/709/hostcontrol/updating-name-servers-in-hostcontrol.aspx

 

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  A


An "A" record is used to point a domain or subdomain to an IP Address. For example, if we wanted to point domainname.com to our web server sand.studiocoast.com.au, then we would setup an "A" record for domainname.com to point to:
103.4.212.222

Name: This will be the domain name or subdomain
Type: A
Value: The IP Address you wish to point the domain name to

An "A" record allows you to point your domain name to a website. Or more specifically, to the server that the website is hosted on.

 

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  MX


An "MX" record is used to point a domain or subdomain to a Mail Server in order to receive emails through. The value the MX record needs to point to must be a name and cannot be an IP Address. The MX record value is also made up of two parts. The priority and then the mail server address. An email host will also usually supply more than one MX record that needs to go into your DNS. For example, if we wanted to point domainname.com to our mail server moon.studiocoast.com.au, then we would setup our two "MX" records for domainname.com to point to:
10 moon-inbound.studiocoast.com.au
20 moon.studiocoast.com.au

Name: This will be the domain name or subdomain
Type: MX
Value: The priority number then a space followed by the mail server address. An MX record also requires a full stop on the end which will be added automatically.

StudioCoast have multiple mail servers and they differ between accounts. To check what mail server you are on, log into hostControl and then select the "Email Accounts" menu item under the General section. Then click the 'Connect Info' link to the right of an email account.

An "MX" record allows you to point your domain name to email hosting.

 

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  CNAME


A "CNAME" record is used to create an alias for a subdomain to another domain or subdomain. For example, you may want to create an alias for mail.domainname.com to point to your mail server address such as moon.studiocoast.com.au so it is easy for you to remember when you browse to webmail in your browser or enter it into your email program's mail server settings.

Name: This will be the subdomain (must be a subdomain)
Type: CNAME
Value: The domain name or subdomain address you wish to make it an alias to.

 

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  TXT


A "TXT" record is for more advanced DNS entries and provides text information to sources outside your domain. The text can be either human-or machine-readable and can be used for a variety of purposes. One use for a TXT record is to add an SPF record.

 

Name: The domain name
Type: TXT
Value: The value for the TXT record (this will differ depending on what it is for). A TXT record must always be inside quotation marks.

 

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  SRV


A "SRV" record is for more advanced DNS entries and provides the ability to allow specific services to be directed to a separate location. One example is an autodiscover entry. The below example creates an autodiscover SRV record that works with our hosting. This allows you to setup an POP email account in Outlook using the automatic method. It will look for the autodiscover DNS entry and pull the information from the value's service.

Name: The name field is made up of three parts: _service._proto.name
_service: The symbolic name of the desired service
_proto: The transport protocol of the desired service (usually this will be TCP or UDP)
name: The domain name (the same domain name the DNS is for)
Type: SRV
Value The value for a SRV record is made up of 4 different parts. Priority weight port target. In the above example, this is:
Priority: 0
Weight: 0
Port: 443
Target: secure.hostcontrol.com.au

 

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Last Updated:  7/03/2016 4:11 PM